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ISUZU DPF DEF                                                                   2012 Gas Engine

Fleet management made Easy

Driver Training Made Easier

Deciding Where Money can be saved - - Priceless

When focusing how to save money the need to gain qualified data versus subjective data is priceless. Guessing and assuming puts unreliable information in front of decision makers. No other cab over truck captures the data that Isuzu can. No other manufacturers slam down the gauntlet and declares "it is what it is - - and I can live with the truth". Isuzu does because "what ifs" are devastating.
ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE ISUZU DPF DEF NPR DIESEL ENGINE
So kill "what if" wth the Isuzu.


2007 Emmissions
2010 Emmissions
How it Works
Driver Reference
FAQ
Being Green

 2007 Emissions Standards Challenge                               return to top

2007 VIDEO DPF                        2007 ESPANOL VIDEO DPF
All diesel engines produced starting January 1, 2007 must comply with the new regulations that require the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx), hydrocarbons (HC) and particulate matter (PM) by 90% over the current 2004 emission standards. Further reductions of NOx, HC and PM will be required by 2010.
Emissions must be reduced in all types of operation, including stop-and-go situations. All diesel engine manufacturers will have to meet these stringent emissions standards, resulting in additional hardware, software and ultimately, higher costs.

Road Tested 60,000 Times

While other engine brands ask you to perform the real world testing of the new 2007 emissions technology, the 2007 emissions technology built into Isuzu engines has already been proven on more than 60,000 trucks operating globally for the past three years. You can be confident that Isuzu engines will deliver top performance.



Isuzu’s 2013 N-Series trucks are the first medium-duty low-cab-forward trucks to meet the most stringent emissions standards in the world. They are:
•Environmental Protection Agency 2010 compliant
•California Air Resources Board (CARB) HD-OBD compliant
•Clean-idle certified

Isuzu’s heritage of clean diesel technology enables us to be the first to offer Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology with Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) injection.

State-of-the-art SCR technology

 Here’s how it works.                                     return to top
•The engine’s stainless-steel exhaust system routes to a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and SCR system unit
•Diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) is injected into the exhaust stream between the filter and the SCR catalyst
•The heat of the exhaust turns the fluid into ammonia gas, water vapor and carbon dioxide
•Inside the catalyst, ammonia gas transforms the exhaust’s oxides of nitrogen (NOx) into harmless nitrogen gas

Together with an enhanced exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system and variable-geometry turbocharger, SCR technology allows all 2011 Isuzu N-Series trucks to meet the demanding emissions standards.

This revised exhaust system also monitors the DPF’s particulate status and the level of DEF required for the SCR system to operate, and reports the results to the driver through the Multi-Information Display.

Under normal highway operating conditions, the DPF will regenerate itself automatically to remove particulate matter from the exhaust. But under slow-speed, stop-and-go or long-idle conditions, the system may require—and will allow—the driver to manually initiate a DPF regeneration cycle manually.

The convenient DEF tank

It stores 7.4 gallons of diesel exhaust fluid, and is even equipped with a heating element to ensure reliable operation in cold-climate conditions.

DEF consumption is only 1% of fuel used, so the DEF tank should be refilled every 20-25 times the fuel tank is refilled.


 DRIVER CARD                          return to top

DIESEL EMISSIONS DRIVER INFORMATION CARD - REGENERATION Regeneration is the process by which the Diesel Particulate Filter ( DPF) self-cleans by burning off collective particulate matter (soot). Automatic regeneration occurs as part of normal driving and is transparent to the operator.

AUTOMATIC REGENERATION - Green indicates that regeneration is underway. Let the engine continue to operate until the lamp extinguishes, typically 20-30 minutes of normal driving.

MANUAL REGENERATION -

Amber indicates a partially clogged filter.

Red indicates a severely clogged filter.

If the amber light is ignored, it can turn to red in conjunction with an audio chime. This is an indication that if manual regeneration is not performed, the engine will go into reduced power mode to prevent damage to vehicle systems.

There are two options:
• Drive the vehicle above 30 miles-per-hour until the amber indicator light goes off or
• Place the truck in Park or Neutral with the parking brake on and press the regeneration switch. Regeneration is normally in about 20 minutes. The switch will illuminate indicating a regeneration is initiated. When regeneration is complete the instrument panel lights will go out. Full instructions are located on the label attached to the sunvisor.

Orange indicates reduced power mode.
WARNING: Ignoring the light, especially if it turns red can result in the engine entering reduced power mode and will require the operator to return to an authorized dealer for service.

Caution: During regeneration exhaust parts and gasses become very hot when idling in Park. Make sure exhaust area is clear of
material that could ignite and burn.


 ISUZU SCR 2010                                                                     return to top

2010 DEF Video                                     2010 DEF Espanol Video

The fundamental concern for the environment, and the people who live in it, has driven Isuzu to be one of the world’s leaders in “green” diesel technology. After many years of development and testing, Isuzu has determined that Isuzu diesel trucks will use Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology to meet the new EPA 2010 heavy duty vehicle emissions standards.

What is the EPA 2010 Emission Standard?

The purpose of the 2010 emissions standard is to further reduce NOx emissions from heavy duty engines. Simply stated, NOx is a generic term for oxides of nitrogen (primarily NO and NO2). These oxides are produced in the cylinder of an engine during the high temperatures of combustion. Starting January 1st, 2010, engine NOx emissions must be reduced by 85% over current levels. This new level of reduction results in a cumulative NOx reduction of 99% from 1974 levels, and clearly makes diesel engines clean, green technology. The implementation of this standard will have an overwhelmingly positive impact on our environment and on the air that we breathe in the future.

Why Use Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Technology?

After many years of extensive testing and study, Isuzu has determined that SCR is the most cost-effective, reliable, and fuel-efficient way to meet the very strict EPA 2010 emissions standards. The ability to meet strict requirements affordably without compromising vehicle performance, operating cost and uptime is essential. In commercial trucking, the ability to reduce emissions to near-zero levels while also delivering fuel savings and improved engine reliability distinguishes SCR as the preferred emissions control technology that is as good for business as it is for the environment.

These considerations have led Isuzu, as well as the majority of other diesel engine and truck manufacturers, to select SCR as the technology of choice to meet EPA 2010 emissions standards

.

 FAQs                                                                                               return to top
TM10131 (06/09) © 2009 Isuzu Commercial Truck of America, Inc.
Q: Why SCR?
A. Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology is the most cost-effective method to reduce NOx emissions and reduce our environmental imprint.
Q: Is SCR proven technology?
A. Absolutely. Isuzu has been developing next generation emission technologies for many years. Europe has more than 600,000 trucks using SCR. SCR has become the global standard for meeting the most stringent diesel engine emissions requirements.
Q: What is Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF)?
A. DEF is a solution of 32.5% automotive grade urea and 67.5% pure water. DEF is classified as a non-hazardous substance by the EPA and the Department of Homeland Security. When injected into an SCR Catalyst, DEF can reduce over 85% of the harmful NOx found in diesel exhaust to harmless nitrogen gas and water vapor.
Q: How much DEF will I Use?
A. DEF usage will be under 2% of diesel fuel usage for most operators. A typical Isuzu N-Series truck will use about 1 gallon of DEF per week.
Q: How much will DEF Cost?
A. The retail cost of DEF will be determined by the market conditions. In Europe, DEF currently costs about $2.50 per gallon.
Q: Where can I buy DEF?
A. DEF will be sold at truck stops and diesel refueling stations, as well as your local Isuzu dealer. All vehicles equipped with SCR will use the same specification for DEF. Since SCR will be used by almost all manufacturers to meet EPA 2010 emissions regulations, DEF will be readily available across the country.
Q: How will the operator be affected?
A. SCR requires less driver interaction than current DPF systems. The SCR system operates automatically, and does not require driver intervention. A fluid level indicator on the dash provides alerts to the driver to refill the tank.  These alerts start hundreds of miles before the vehicle runs out of DEF. Refilling the DEF tank will be similar to refilling the windshield washer fluid bottle.
Q: What happens if I run out of DEF? Will I get stranded by the side of the road?
A. The vehicle will clearly communicate the DEF level to the driver. Visual and audible alarms will sound alerting the driver that the vehicle is running out of DEF hundreds of miles before the tank is empty. If the driver chooses to ignore these numerous alerts, and runs the vehicle out of DEF, the engine will go into a performance-restricted mode and will eventually no longer restart. However, the engine will not stop running and strand the driver if the vehicle runs out of DEF.
Q: How will these new emissions regulations affect fuel consumption?
A. Isuzu expects vehicles meeting the EPA 2010 emissions requirement to offer better fuel consumption than current vehicles.
Q: How will maintenance be affected with this new technology?
A. Minimal maintenance is required of the SCR system. The system has a DEF filter. This is a simple spin-on cartridge filter that will need to be replaced every 1-2 years. All other vehicle maintenance intervals will be unchanged.

 


                                                                                                           return to top

The “Greenest” Isuzu Ever
On March 16, 1984, Isuzu low cab forward trucks were introduced to the U.S. market. Isuzu’s corporate philosophy was to grow its business in harmony with people and society. Twenty-five years later, this same strategy is the foundation of Isuzu’s SEE (Safety, Economy, and Environment) philosophy.

This fundamental concern for the environment, and the people who live in it, has driven Isuzu
to be one of the world’s leaders in “green” diesel technology. After many years of development
and testing, Isuzu has determined that Isuzu diesel trucks will use Selective Catalytic Reduction
(SCR) technology to meet the new EPA 2010 heavy duty vehicle emissions standards.

What is the EPA 2010 Emission Standard?
The purpose of the 2010 emissions standard is to further reduce NOx emissions from heavy duty engines. Simply stated, NOx is a generic term for oxides of nitrogen (primarily NO and NO2). These oxides are produced in the cylinder of an engine during the high temperatures of combustion. Starting January 1st, 2010, engine NOx emissions must be reduced by 85% over current levels. This new level of reduction results in a cumulative NOx reduction of 99% from 1974 levels, and clearly makes diesel engines clean, green technology. The implementation of this standard will have an overwhelmingly positive impact on our environment and on the air that we breathe in the future.

Why Use Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Technology?
After many years of extensive testing and study, Isuzu has determined that SCR is the most cost-effective, reliable, and fuel-efficient way to meet the very strict EPA 2010 emissions standards. The ability to meet strict requirements affordably without compromising vehicle performance, operating cost and uptime is essential. In commercial trucking, the ability to reduce emissions to near-zero levels while also delivering fuel savings and improved engine reliability distinguishes SCR as the preferred emissions control technology that is as good for business as it is for the environment.

These considerations have led Isuzu, as well as the majority of other diesel engine and truck manufacturers, to select SCR as the technology of choice to meet EPA 2010 emissions standards.
How SCR Works SCR works by injecting a very precise amount of an automotive grade urea/water solution (called Diesel Exhaust Fluid, or DEF) into the vehicle’s hot exhaust stream. Under the heat of the vehicle’s exhaust, the urea in the DEF is converted into ammonia gas and carbon dioxide. Once inside the SCR catalyst, this ammonia gas forms a chemical reaction with the oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emitted by the engine. As a result of this chemical reaction, SCR is able to reduce harmful oxides of nitrogen into harmless water vapor and nitrogen gas – natural elements common to the air we breathe.

The SCR Performance Advantage When EPA 2010 standards go into effect, no heavy duty on-highway engine can emit oxide of nitrogen (NOx) levels higher than 0.2 g/bhp-hr (grams per brake horsepower-hour). This is the most stringent emissions standard in the world.

In Europe, where SCR technology has been in use for several years, SCR operators have demonstrated lower operating costs and increased truck resale values. It is the only technology that optimizes fuel efficiency while allowing the engine to run cleaner. SCR is reliable and reigns as the dominant emissions control technology in Europe where more than 600,000 SCR-equipped trucks are in operation today.

Isuzu’s decision to combine SCR with existing Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) technology will reduce engine emissions to near-zero levels, while reducing vehicle operating costs and increasing vehicle performance.

Public Health Impact
The direct health implications of vehicle emissions, including exhaust from cars and trucks, are a concern to us all. Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx), originating from gasoline and diesel engines are a major air pollutant that contributes to smog and ozone formation. This can negatively impact our health, and can contribute to symptoms of asthma, respiratory and heart diseases. For these reasons, EPA 2010 is the most positive emissions control ever implemented.

Alternative Technology
Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR), is an alternative technology offered by a limited number of manufacturers to meet EPA 2010 emissions requirements. Isuzu has been in production with diesel engines using EGR for over 10 years, and will continue to use EGR in engines meeting the 2010 emissions requirements. While EGR is a known, proven, and effective way to reduce engine NOx emissions, Isuzu engineers felt that relying on EGR alone to meet the extremely low NOx levels required by the EPA 2010 regulation would require a massive increase in EGR rates that would increase engine heat rejection, increase internal stresses on engine components, and increase engine fuel consumption. Given these considerations, Isuzu has chosen to combine EGR with SCR to produce an extremely clean engine with the best-in-class reliability and lowest operating costs that Isuzu is known for.

What is Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF)?
Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) is a solution made of purified water and 32.5% automotive-grade urea. This is the carrying agent for the ammonia needed to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from vehicles into nitrogen, water and carbon dioxide (CO2). This fluid is known by the trade name “AdBlue” in Europe. The Diesel Exhaust Fluid sold in the US will meet the exact same specifications as the fluid that has been sold in Europe for years. The fluid is colorless, largely odorless, and is classified by the EPA and Department of Homeland Security as a non-hazardous substance. 

DEF has a freezing point of +12 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that in cold weather, the tank and DEF lines could freeze without keeping them warm. This concern has been taken into account in the design of all SCR systems. These systems have been in use in Europe for years, and cold weather use in Scandinavian countries has not been an issue. The Isuzu SCR system will have a heated tank and lines that will keep the DEF thawed. The EPA allows a suitable warm-up time for the DEF tank and lines to thaw. As a result, Isuzu does not anticipate any changes in cold-weather starting or operating procedures as a result of SCR implementation.

The process of manufacturing and distributing Diesel Exhaust Fluid is certified for quality by the American Petroleum Institute. The urea used for Diesel Exhaust Fluid is automotive-grade. Do not confuse this grade with different grades used for agricultural and industrial needs, including emissions control by public utilities and power plants. These other grades of urea may carry contaminants that can cause damage to the vehicle’s emissions control system. This damage will not be covered under warranty.

Diesel Exhaust Fluid appropriate for use in engine emissions systems will be clearly labeled with
the API seal of approval.

Diesel Exhaust Fluid, a major component of SCR operation, has four additional factors that
contribute to the viability of SCR:
• Availability
• Purity and quality
• Transportation and distribution networks
• Dispensing equipment and packaging alternatives

Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF), will be available at truck stops, diesel fuel stations, and in
prepackaged containers from your Isuzu truck dealership and truck and automotive parts
and accessory outlets.

DEF consumption will be approximately 2% of diesel fuel consumption. This means that a typical
Isuzu N-Series diesel truck will use about 1 gallon of DEF per week.

Manufacturers are Adopting Urea SCR as a Worldwide Technology More than 600,000 diesel trucks in Europe now use SCR and the fleet is growing by approximately 25,000 trucks per month. SCR technology is not limited to medium and heavy-duty trucks. Passenger car and light truck manufacturers around the world are adopting SCR technology as all industrialized
countries adopt more stringent emissions requirements.

According to one European Truck manufacturer, the engine efficiency achieved by using SCR technology has saved customers more than 280 million liters of diesel fuel and nearly half a billion dollars in fuel spending. At the same time, 800,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide have not entered the environment.

With Isuzu, It’s Easy Being Green - Isuzu’s SEE philosophy means that a commitment to Safety, Economy, and the Environment is reflected in every truck made. Isuzu is committed to meeting the world’s most stringent emissions requirements without impacting vehicle operating costs, reliability, or uptime.  Isuzu’s 2011 model year vehicles will meet the EPA’s 0.2 g/bhp-hr NOx requirements with improved fuel consumption, no reduction in maintenance intervals, and the world-class reliability that has resulted in Isuzu-built trucks being the number one selling Low Cab Forward vehicle in the U.S. for 23 years and counting.

SEE is a trademark of Isuzu Motors Limited
All photographs, illustrations, equipment and technical data shown in this brochure are based on the latest information available at the time of publication. Isuzu Commercial Truck of America, Inc. reserves
the right to make changes at any time, without notice. Some vehicles are shown with optional equipment. See your authorized Isuzu Truck dealer for warranty and other details. NPR, NPR-HD, NQR, and
NRR are trademarks of Isuzu Motors Limited.

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